Tagged: 20mm

Gaslands – Hot Wheels ’69 Pontiac Firebird T/A WIP 2

Seriously, I don’t know why I paint these when I’m planning to weather them.

When last we visited the Firebird, she was mostly built, sanded, and primed.

I went with a bright orange for the body, and added a couple of primered doors. Bright red for the fuel barrels (all of which will become increasingly subtle as I continue).

At this point, the car was pretty much complete, if a little too bright and shiny for my team.

Let the weathering begin! A heavy wash with Reikland Fleshshade and some bullet holes in the windshield (pin vise plus some scratches with a blade for the surrounding cracks), and we’re on our way. Really, I could probably leave stuff at this point but the team I’ve built this far is *very* heavily rusted out, so I’m gonna keep going.

And there we go. Some Vallejo Burnt Cadmium followed by a pair of weathering powders, plus some Agrellan Earth for dust and dirt. That primered for is almost invisible now, even if you’re looking squarely at it.

The bullet holes are a little less clear on this one than the corvette’s were, but they’ll do. I did notice at this point that some rust had crept onto the glass, but it scraped away pretty well after this shot was taken.

So, there we go! I have mixed feelings about this one. I like everything I did to it, but it sorta feels like I spent a lot of time doing nothing. I mean, the barrels have no game effect, I didn’t add a ram or weapons of any type… This is literally just a baseline car that I spent a bunch of time on, haha.

I like it anyway, and I suppose it will make a good car for campaigns. I can use it for the baseline model, and then swap it for something with weapons after I’ve earned some cans…

Or just try it as a baseline car? Might be a good opportunity to see just how helpful upgrades really are (or aren’t)?

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Gaslands – Hot Wheels ’69 Pontiac Firebird T/A WIP 1

Another Gaslands project of course begins with another stock internet photo, because I once again got so excited to start chopping it up that I forgot to snap a photo beforehand.

I got a bunch of new bits courtesy of Curtis at Ramshackle Games, including some of his new barrels and gas cans and such. My immediate desire was to drop them into an open trunk, Interceptor – style, but I couldn’t find anything that would lend itself to such a modification (I have neither a Dremel nor a proper jeweler’s saw, so I’m limited to straight cuts at the moment).

Lacking an easily removable trunk, I opted for the next best thing; I am very into chopping the tops off these things lately.

I went with this Firebird because I could actually work around the trunk entirely and drop my extra fuel tanks into the backseat. You know, once I was rid of the backseat…

Again, just a combination of straight cuts with the razor saw. I actually built a box out of tread plate for this one but it was probably a pretty big waste of my time. By the time I’d incorporated some fuel lines into the design and tucked the barrels in, the box is pretty invisible. You’ll see.

This being one of those hot wheels with an entire extra piece in the middle (and holding the wheels on place) meant getting a little more creative. Note I opted to keep the original wheels on this one. I love me some off road tires, but these just really seemed to suit the car so I kept them.

I actually did some sanding of the body this time. I was planning to repaint (no interest in keeping it emblazoned with Hot Wheels banners) and in the past I’ve noticed you can sometimes see the shape of the decals through a coat or two of paint (my Frazetta fantasy van has faint fireball outlines if you look closely). Those are the barrels I’ll be converting into spare tanks; I think the scale is pretty good on those.

Barrels/tanks are in place along with fuel lines (the same wire I use for pinning, but with the insulation left on), and I’ve bent and trimmed a Stan Johansen gunner into a more driver-y shape. Plus he’s got a pin in his butt, just so he doesn’t end up glued merely to some paint over fake chrome (I don’t want him snapping off later).

And here we go. The body’s riding a little high because I haven’t snapped it down into place, the windshield hasn’t been put back in yet, and the driver is drying elsewhere. This is a pretty decent indication of where I’m headed, though. ‘Til next time.

Gaslands – Matchbox ’70 Pontiac GTO WIP 1

I’m generally pretty annoyed with the way the local Value Village handles the toy cars (and they’re not alone or anything, I’ve seen lots of stores in other cities do the same); the cars get bundled into bags and then tagged at $3.99 or $5.99 or something similar. It’s annoying because there’s usually not enough in a bag to justify the price regardless of what the cars are, and doubly so because there’s always one good car, one potential scrap car (good tires or a cool engine or something), and a bunch of chaff. Which is made worse by the fact that – based on the inevitable holes torn in the sides – other folks just yank the good car out and leave the rest. You occasionally find something worthwhile, but you have to buy a bunch of garbage at the same time.

Vent complete.

Miracle of miracles, I occasionally find a bag that’s pretty okay. One time it was a bag of 3 Monster Jam trucks, another time it was a DeLorean time machine, a Firebird, a pretty sweet GTO, a 50s Chevy of some ilk, and a Silverado. Okay, I have no real need for the Silverado, but it had a to-scale bike in the back, so we’ll call it a win. This weekend I started messing around with the GTO.

Stock, this is what it looked like at one point. Mine was in rougher shape, with the roof a little squashed and the spoiler broken, plus lots of paint chipping (never a problem for Gaslands). I started by cutting off that roof.

I opted to smash up the windshield and put some of it into place. Looks okay.

I was originally thinking about putting a floor in the back, so I cut the rear seats out, but changed my mind one things got under way. I also repaired the spoiler; probably pretty unnecessary, but it will help maintain the ‘car feel’ a little.

I am also, of course, a sucker for big offroad tires.

Add a ‘ram’ made from 40k centurion parts and a bit of plating on the back, and we’ve got a solid baseline!

Doesn’t look much like a car anymore, though, does it?

Gaslands – 50pt Death Race Duel

Another Death Race this week. Decided to run 50pts this time instead of 60 to put a little more crunch into the build process. B brought a truck and a buggy, both tricked out with turreted HMGs and extra armour. I brought a performance car and a buggy with lesser armaments but more tricks. Big Tires, Hell for Leather, lots of nitrous, all sponsored by Idris.

The starting lineup.

I was right fast, but messy as hell. He was slower but a lot cleaner.

Turn 1, Gear Phase 1

I started with a pair of Hell for Leather induced Long/Slide/Spins. Bad news hazard-wise, but got me an early jump and a couple audience votes.

Turn 1, Gear Phase 2

I followed up with a similar second phase (long/slide/spin for the Road Runner and a clumsy nitrous boost for the Manx), but both cars ended up wiping out. Even with the Big Tires, the treacherous terrain put me up over the line.

Turn 1, Gear Phase 3

I used my 4 audience votes to pop both cars into 3rd and keep going. Decent plan for the buggy (it got itself back into the race), but a stupid mistake for the Road Runner. Its best option was a 3rd gear hairpin through that treacherous terrain, and the dice were not on my side. It wiped out again, flipping this time for some extra distance.

Turn 1, Gear Phase 4

The Manx managed to gain a little ground without crashing into his teammate, but that was about it. We were both rolling pretty terribly during this match. B’s truck and buggy continued to prove the value of slow and steady.

Turn 1, Gear Phase 5

The Manx wiped out again, but not before covering a decent bit of distance. This time it was its turn to flip for an extra few inches.

This bright is to the end of Turn 1; B’s team also had some bad rolls and neither got out of 4th gear.

Turn 2, Gear Phase 1

Snapped that photo a little early, apparently, so I added the Manx’s movement. It tucked nicely into the high – risk shortcut that I built into the second corner (I put one of these in the first game I played with C, and it made for some hilarious levels of mayhem).

The Road Runner’s reverse turn fell apart when I misjudged the size of the slide template and wound up sitting next to a bunch of exploding barrels. My spin would no longer get me where I needed to be, so instead I used it to line up a shot. Now I’d be going into the 2nd phase still facing the wrong way.

Turn 2, Gear Phase 2

The Manx cleared the shortcut, but wiped out in the process. The Road Runner got in a ram, but at this point was surrounded by turreted HMGs that were starting to come on line as they crossed that first gate.

Turn 2, Gear Phase 3

At this point the Manx was stuck in first and the Road Runner was taken apart by multiple HMGs. B’s truck and buggy continued their advance.

Turn 2, Gear Phase 4

Further sitting for the Manx, and B’s cars/HMGs drew ever closer. They were still in 4th gear, so this brought Turn 2 to a close.

Turn 3, Gear Phase 1

This is it, my bitter end. Forward wasn’t an option this time and even a short reverse left me in the turret-path of B’s advancing buggy. He told some 6’s, and I didn’t. With only the two of us playing, we didn’t bother with respawns, so this was the game.

That’s two Idris losses in a row for me. I think I’m getting overly hung up on trying to maximize certain aspects while ignoring other factors. Hell for Leather is certainly a way to generate Idris audience votes, but a bike can do the same thing for the same points, and is a whole extra vehicle. An HFL monster truck can use it to more easily trample/clear other vehicles, but cars are just getting a couple of template boosts. The free shift results coming out of the medium template are probably worth using it instead (I was picking up so many hazards I ended up using all my votes just to stay in the game anyway).

Weapons are the other issue here. I wanted more points for perks, so I avoided turreting any weapons, but I was so far ahead that my front facing HMG was generally useless and it was hard to find a good opportunity to drop caltrops.

I’ll have to give some more thought to future builds. The Manx wasn’t bad (although the HFL points would be better spent elsewhere) but the Road Runner was pretty much a hodgepodge of mismatched ideas (admittedly I just wanted to field that build because I like how it looks, which might not have been a very strategic plan, haha).

Until next time, here’s a final shot of this crew:

Gaslands – Meyers Manx

My latest start-to-finish project is a Hot Wheels Meyers Manx. It’s actually my second Manx; the first I left pretty much stock.

Meyers Manx I

Other than popping some Stan Johansen figures into it, I haven’t done much. I expect I’ll paint the figures (and seats) at some point, but I don’t expect I’ll do much beyond that. It looks fun as is, so why change anything?

The new one was a little beat up, with the roll bar missing and the windshield broken so it seemed like a great opportunity to go nuts. What better place to start than a wheel swap?

The wheels came off a Matchbox MBX 4×4 with ‘Panthera Trackers’ emblazoned across the hood. It will become a wreck. Obviously there was no way those wheels were going to fit in the original slots. Not only were the wheel wells too shallow, but I had to alter the wheelbase as well; I opted to cut new slots on the outside with a hacksaw.

This let me keep the axles intact. They nestled into place quite well, and I used some green stuff to secure them afterwards.

I also added a bit of plating to cover the windshield gap and the missing roll bar, and gave the car a matt varnish in preparation for painting. Primer followed close behind.

For crew I used a couple of Ramshackle miniatures. I’m not a huge fan of the resin he uses (it’s very brittle and I found it more awkward to work with than other resins), but apparently it’s one of the reasons he can keep his prices as low as they are, so I’ll make do. They looked pretty decent once they were painted up, especially considering how tiny they are. There’s not a lot of room in the Manx; I actually had to trim some of the dashboard off in addition to the steering wheel, just to get the driver to fit. Had to trim his steering wheel back as well.

I also added some extra exhausts to the car (they came off some weird little dollar-store-looking garbage car that I got in a thrift baggie). I almost added an oversized engine block poking through the hood before I remembered the engine is in the back. The car itself got a Vallejo Turquoise paint job (no idea why I bother, haha), and a combo of GW’s Agrax and Reikland are used for a wash layer. Looked pretty rough at that point, but I was planning to rust this one pretty heavily so it wouldn’t be a big issue in the long run.

Look at these little monsters!

This brought me to the rust/dirt portion of the project. Some matt medium mixed with my favourite Vallejo pigments, followed with some of GW’s Agrellan Earth for dirt and dust, and we’re ready to go!

And for easy comparison, here’s a before and after using a stock photo; in really happy with how this little fellow turned out. Manx II is ready to rumble!

Gaslands – 60-can Death Race Duel

Thought I’d try some new options last night, and took a car, a bike, and a monster truck up against B’s truck and car. I brought a couple of rams and some perks; he brought turret-mounted rockets and HMGs.

Things got messy real fast. His pickup (Optimus) made a quick left to try and get away from my monster truck, but Wile E there gunned it over the car and slid into Optimus anyway (3 cheers for Hell for Leather).

The first half of the race was definitely going well for me. I was setting a solid pace and leaving Optimus and Ecto far behind. Probably should have been a lock but I made a couple of big errors that got me torn apart. The first was that I tried to put my car into too sharp a turn while in 4th gear; the Medium template B handed me in combination with a bad skid check left my car sliding right off the course.

A short while after that I forgot how fragile Bikes are and let myself wipe out in a high gear with only 2 bull points remaining. I had the shift dice available to drop into second, but didn’t think about that until after our already resolved everything. Sure enough, the Bike flipped and wrecked, leaving only poor Wile E to try and finish the race.

Unfortunately the track put him in range of Optimus right as the pickup cleared the first gate, and my poor Monster Truck was pummeled by rockets taking 5 damage, reducing him to 4 remaining hull points. I tried using audience votes to drown Optimus in hazards (he was a half inch from hitting a fence) but his Thunderous Applause cleared him completely, and I couldn’t get far enough away in time to prevent my taking another barrage of rocket fire.

Since it was just the two of us playing, we didn’t bother with respawns, and called the game in B’s favour since I was out of cars. Till next time!

Gaslands – Mazda RX-3 and ’65 Corvette

I was so happy with the results of my Vallejo pigment experiment that I picked up an additional pigment (dark red ochre) to use with my next two cars, a Mazda RX-3 from the Hot Wheels ‘Japan Historics’ line, and a thrifted 65 Corvette convertible. I think they look great, but let’s spend some time seeing how each of them got to where they ended up.

Hot Wheels ‘Japan Historics’ Mazda RX-3.

This car actually cost money, sort of. Almost five bucks Canadian. Which is one of the things I’m loving about Gaslands. $5cdn is an *expensive* miniature. Hahaha. I’m not sure why, but this one called to me from the rack; there would be no leaving it behind.


It got some extra exhausts and armour plating from the good ol’ pile o’ orky bitz, plus a buzzsaw ram that looks like it probably came off a Nob. That’s just a regular piece of coated copper wire connecting it to the hood (same stuff I use for pinning, I’m still working through a roll that I got about 25 years ago while going through a ‘learning about electronics’ phase as a child). The plating on the front window is actually just plastic from the car’s blisterpack, with the ‘rivets’ pressed into it from the other side. I cut the passenger seat out (1 crew means this will be a performance car), mounted the heavy machine gun from the roof, and dropped a block of engine-looking mechanical goodness into the space where the rear window used to be.


Next I cut some viewslats into the ‘windshield’ (I meant to do that before mounting it, but I was excited and got ahead of my process, haha), and glued some window screen into the side windows for a welded wire cage effect. That came out better than I expected.

I painted up the interior (I didn’t prime the RX-3 interior as I didn’t originally plan to bother with it, and wow did paint ever bead up on it at first, haha…), even though it’s almost totally hidden away behind the plated windscreen and the cage windows; gives me a sense of completedness that I don’t think I would have otherwise. It was tempting to put a driver in, and I *do* have some at this point (more on those shortly), but they’re not exactly free so I think I’ll be saving them for convertibles and other ‘open’ projects.

Next I painted up the various bits and hit the original paint job with some Vallejo Matt Varnish (just so additional weathering would have a little more to stick to, rather than that super glossy enamel finish). Citadel Reikland Fleshshade washed over everything (especially the ‘metal’ parts) and things were starting to come together. At this point I finally got a real sense of what that windshield plating would look like, and it was pleasantly close to what I’d envisioned.

Weathering time! This time I had two distinct tones of pigment (Vallejo’s Brown Iron Oxide and Dark Red Ochre) so I worked up from brown to red and then added some dust with Citadel Agrellan Earth. Ready to hit the road!

The 1965 Corvette.

The Mazda was now ready for the Gaslands, but it wasn’t the only car in the garage that week. I was also putting together a 65 Corvette. I realize most corvettes are fiberglass so the heavy rusting isn’t necessarily a logical weathering process for this guy, but then I thought, ‘who cares?’ Grin. Seriously, though, If you were taking a Corvette out into the Gaslands for a demolition death rally every couple of weeks, you’d probably have had to replace the fiberglass pretty early, right? So that’s what I’m picturing. I think this guy came out of a 49c bucket at a Duluth Goodwill.

The Corvette got some fancy upgrades in the form of a turreted heavy machine gun and some significantly heavier rear wheels. Slicks don’t seem like they’d generally be a great option for the gaslands, so I found something that felt a little more offroad. Can’t remember what they came off of, but probably either heavy equipment or the Sting Rod II. For the turret effect I just did a long pinning that I didn’t fully glue and then game the car a similar treatment to the Mazda; some paint on the modified bits, a matt varnish, and then some Reikland wash.

This car is a convertible, which meant it was going to be super obvious that it lacked a driver, so I hit the internet looking for some solutions. I decided to try a couple options, and ordered a variety of 20mm drivers, gunners and riders from Stan Johansen (the magnificent Stan packed a few extras in as well!) and dug in. I actually used a gunner for this one, and bent him a little to turn his loose standing pose into a low profile seated position. Mostly I just needed to shift the arms and head a little.

I did much of the Corvette’s rusting before putting the windshield in so that it could get really crusty where the edge of the metal met it. I also lightly sponged (‘dry-sponged’?) some of the Agrellan Earth onto it and drilled a couple bullet holes. the spiderweb cracks were just scratched into the plastic with a blade. It wasn’t until after I’d put it all together that I realized that my driver was either pretty lucky, or not the first driver of this car.

These two cars come in at about 50 cans between them, so they’re pretty much a starting team on their own. I fielded them last week alongside a little Meyer’s Manx that I haven’t done anything to, yet, in terms of modifications. Soon, perhaps. See you in the gaslands!