Tagged: mad max

Gaslands – Death Race

A couple fresh new players this week, and Brad brought his terrain along, so it was a nice big chaotic learning game.

Racers on the line and ready to go…

We were running 60 can teams, so with new players it was pretty much a guarantee we wouldn’t finish, but lots of cars means lots of interactions, and that’s always a good thing when you’re learning (whereas finishing and somebody winning is a whole lot less useful).

Teams.

We got off to a gloriously messy start. The three cars on the road in the front line got off to a decent start, but the yellow truck had to get off the shoulder and that threw everybody else off.

Going into gear phase 2.

I managed to position the Cougar decently in the first phase and lined up a Slip Away opportunity for gear 2. The Cougar (silver) bumped the GTX (green), which put the GTX comfortably in the lead. As a performance car with only armour and smoke, I wanted him way ahead before the rest of the pack hit gate 1.

Going into gear 3.

The GTX was doing well at this point, but the Cougar and my Manx (the first buggy way in the back) got pretty bogged down in that starting pileup. I was able to keep them in good shape, but they were moving pretty slow. Some I tend to soft up early and fast, that meant a lot of swerves, veers, and evades.

Going into gear 4.

More cars started to get free of the pack around this point, so I made plans to leave the track and cut across the very busy centre of the table with the GTX. This would mean some risky high gear maneuvering.

The pileup.

The Cougar and the Manx were getting ready to break free of the mess at this point, but a wipeout for the Manx left it spinning into the path of the Cougar, slowing them both down again.

Some point in gear 5/6.

We started to spread out a bit more as the gear phases outstripped some of the vehicles. It also gave me the chance to get the Cougar back in the game.

Our first casualty was that orange Flash Drive performance car. It exploded.

The jeep with the big gun opted to take the long safe route along the track instead of following the GTX through the middle. This meant my GTX would approach it head-on, and my smoke would be useless. My Cougar suddenly needed to get its machine guns into play.

All lined up…

The Cougar was able to land several hits over the next couple phases, and the jeep became our second casualty just before it rounded the corner and escaped.

Success!

And that’s pretty much where we ended this particular learning game. A couple vehicles trashed, and the rest of them spread all over the place. Good fun.

Advertisements

Gaslands – Hot Wheels ’69 Pontiac Firebird T/A WIP 1

Another Gaslands project of course begins with another stock internet photo, because I once again got so excited to start chopping it up that I forgot to snap a photo beforehand.

I got a bunch of new bits courtesy of Curtis at Ramshackle Games, including some of his new barrels and gas cans and such. My immediate desire was to drop them into an open trunk, Interceptor – style, but I couldn’t find anything that would lend itself to such a modification (I have neither a Dremel nor a proper jeweler’s saw, so I’m limited to straight cuts at the moment).

Lacking an easily removable trunk, I opted for the next best thing; I am very into chopping the tops off these things lately.

I went with this Firebird because I could actually work around the trunk entirely and drop my extra fuel tanks into the backseat. You know, once I was rid of the backseat…

Again, just a combination of straight cuts with the razor saw. I actually built a box out of tread plate for this one but it was probably a pretty big waste of my time. By the time I’d incorporated some fuel lines into the design and tucked the barrels in, the box is pretty invisible. You’ll see.

This being one of those hot wheels with an entire extra piece in the middle (and holding the wheels on place) meant getting a little more creative. Note I opted to keep the original wheels on this one. I love me some off road tires, but these just really seemed to suit the car so I kept them.

I actually did some sanding of the body this time. I was planning to repaint (no interest in keeping it emblazoned with Hot Wheels banners) and in the past I’ve noticed you can sometimes see the shape of the decals through a coat or two of paint (my Frazetta fantasy van has faint fireball outlines if you look closely). Those are the barrels I’ll be converting into spare tanks; I think the scale is pretty good on those.

Barrels/tanks are in place along with fuel lines (the same wire I use for pinning, but with the insulation left on), and I’ve bent and trimmed a Stan Johansen gunner into a more driver-y shape. Plus he’s got a pin in his butt, just so he doesn’t end up glued merely to some paint over fake chrome (I don’t want him snapping off later).

And here we go. The body’s riding a little high because I haven’t snapped it down into place, the windshield hasn’t been put back in yet, and the driver is drying elsewhere. This is a pretty decent indication of where I’m headed, though. ‘Til next time.

Gaslands – Matchbox ’70 Pontiac GTO WIP 1

I’m generally pretty annoyed with the way the local Value Village handles the toy cars (and they’re not alone or anything, I’ve seen lots of stores in other cities do the same); the cars get bundled into bags and then tagged at $3.99 or $5.99 or something similar. It’s annoying because there’s usually not enough in a bag to justify the price regardless of what the cars are, and doubly so because there’s always one good car, one potential scrap car (good tires or a cool engine or something), and a bunch of chaff. Which is made worse by the fact that – based on the inevitable holes torn in the sides – other folks just yank the good car out and leave the rest. You occasionally find something worthwhile, but you have to buy a bunch of garbage at the same time.

Vent complete.

Miracle of miracles, I occasionally find a bag that’s pretty okay. One time it was a bag of 3 Monster Jam trucks, another time it was a DeLorean time machine, a Firebird, a pretty sweet GTO, a 50s Chevy of some ilk, and a Silverado. Okay, I have no real need for the Silverado, but it had a to-scale bike in the back, so we’ll call it a win. This weekend I started messing around with the GTO.

Stock, this is what it looked like at one point. Mine was in rougher shape, with the roof a little squashed and the spoiler broken, plus lots of paint chipping (never a problem for Gaslands). I started by cutting off that roof.

I opted to smash up the windshield and put some of it into place. Looks okay.

I was originally thinking about putting a floor in the back, so I cut the rear seats out, but changed my mind one things got under way. I also repaired the spoiler; probably pretty unnecessary, but it will help maintain the ‘car feel’ a little.

I am also, of course, a sucker for big offroad tires.

Add a ‘ram’ made from 40k centurion parts and a bit of plating on the back, and we’ve got a solid baseline!

Doesn’t look much like a car anymore, though, does it?

Gaslands – Meyers Manx

My latest start-to-finish project is a Hot Wheels Meyers Manx. It’s actually my second Manx; the first I left pretty much stock.

Meyers Manx I

Other than popping some Stan Johansen figures into it, I haven’t done much. I expect I’ll paint the figures (and seats) at some point, but I don’t expect I’ll do much beyond that. It looks fun as is, so why change anything?

The new one was a little beat up, with the roll bar missing and the windshield broken so it seemed like a great opportunity to go nuts. What better place to start than a wheel swap?

The wheels came off a Matchbox MBX 4×4 with ‘Panthera Trackers’ emblazoned across the hood. It will become a wreck. Obviously there was no way those wheels were going to fit in the original slots. Not only were the wheel wells too shallow, but I had to alter the wheelbase as well; I opted to cut new slots on the outside with a hacksaw.

This let me keep the axles intact. They nestled into place quite well, and I used some green stuff to secure them afterwards.

I also added a bit of plating to cover the windshield gap and the missing roll bar, and gave the car a matt varnish in preparation for painting. Primer followed close behind.

For crew I used a couple of Ramshackle miniatures. I’m not a huge fan of the resin he uses (it’s very brittle and I found it more awkward to work with than other resins), but apparently it’s one of the reasons he can keep his prices as low as they are, so I’ll make do. They looked pretty decent once they were painted up, especially considering how tiny they are. There’s not a lot of room in the Manx; I actually had to trim some of the dashboard off in addition to the steering wheel, just to get the driver to fit. Had to trim his steering wheel back as well.

I also added some extra exhausts to the car (they came off some weird little dollar-store-looking garbage car that I got in a thrift baggie). I almost added an oversized engine block poking through the hood before I remembered the engine is in the back. The car itself got a Vallejo Turquoise paint job (no idea why I bother, haha), and a combo of GW’s Agrax and Reikland are used for a wash layer. Looked pretty rough at that point, but I was planning to rust this one pretty heavily so it wouldn’t be a big issue in the long run.

Look at these little monsters!

This brought me to the rust/dirt portion of the project. Some matt medium mixed with my favourite Vallejo pigments, followed with some of GW’s Agrellan Earth for dirt and dust, and we’re ready to go!

And for easy comparison, here’s a before and after using a stock photo; in really happy with how this little fellow turned out. Manx II is ready to rumble!